IT IS NEW PHONE TIME. Also, asteroids.

That new phone is a Samsung Galaxy S3 to be exact. I finally got tired of my old Blackberry Torch screwing me over, so I took advantage of a Black Friday sale they were having at Best Buy.

No more having to pull the battery when I want to end a phone call! No more having to deal with my Blackberry lulling me into a false sense of security by randomly putting people on hold, then turning speaker phone on full blast while I have it pressed to my ear, temporarily deafening me.

I was fully expecting to have to elbow my way through hordes of people at the store... I walked in and it was dead. Got in and out of the store within fifteen minutes. I was so happy, I have a large personal bubble and hate crowds.

If Black Friday in Canada ever becomes mob-like, as it is in the States, I'll be steering clear of any stores. Hopefully it remains relatively unpopular so I don't have to wrestle people over a good sale, but does well enough that they keep having decent prices.

I'm quite happy with the S3, and the fact that I paid nothing for it. All I had to do was extend my current contract. After enduring the horrible nightmare that is Bell for 3 years before, I was more than happy to sign on for another three years with Telus. So far I have had no issues with them at all.

For the first few days I was glued to my new phone. Enjoying that wonderful time before the novelty wears off and I begin to get angry with it. I was fiddling with the calendar on it and noticed it can only go up to the year 2036. That's an odd number to stop at... why not 2030 or 2050? Why 2036?

Tonight while doing some work on my computer, I had the news playing in the background. I was only half listening when I heard "..predict the chances of an asteroid hitting earth in the year 2036 are one in 200 000 (or some worryingly low number for that event to occur)..."

I looked it up and found this article about an asteroid named Apophis, which has a possibility of hitting Earth in 2029, and then it says this:

  "Scientists calculate that if Apophis passes at a distance of exactly 18,893 miles, it will go through a "gravitational keyhole." This small region in space--only about a half mile wide, or twice the diameter of the asteroid itself--is where Earth's gravity would perturb Apophis in just the wrong way, causing it to enter an orbit seven-sixths as long as Earth's. In other words, the planet will be squarely in the crosshairs for a potentially catastrophic asteroid impact precisely seven years later, on April 13, 2036."


Scientists calculate that if Apophis passes at a distance of exactly 18,893 miles, it will go through a "gravitational keyhole." This small region in space--only about a half mile wide, or twice the diameter of the asteroid itself--is where Earth's gravity would perturb Apophis in just the wrong way, causing it to enter an orbit seven-sixths as long as Earth's. In other words, the planet will be squarely in the crosshairs for a potentially catastrophic asteroid impact precisely seven years later, on April 13, 2036.

Read more: 5 Plans to Head Off the Apophis Killer Asteroid - Popular Mechanics
Scientists calculate that if Apophis passes at a distance of exactly 18,893 miles, it will go through a "gravitational keyhole." This small region in space--only about a half mile wide, or twice the diameter of the asteroid itself--is where Earth's gravity would perturb Apophis in just the wrong way, causing it to enter an orbit seven-sixths as long as Earth's. In other words, the planet will be squarely in the crosshairs for a potentially catastrophic asteroid impact precisely seven years later, on April 13, 2036.

Read more: 5 Plans to Head Off the Apophis Killer Asteroid - Popular Mechanics
Scientists calculate that if Apophis passes at a distance of exactly 18,893 miles, it will go through a "gravitational keyhole." This small region in space--only about a half mile wide, or twice the diameter of the asteroid itself--is where Earth's gravity would perturb Apophis in just the wrong way, causing it to enter an orbit seven-sixths as long as Earth's. In other words, the planet will be squarely in the crosshairs for a potentially catastrophic asteroid impact precisely seven years later, on April 13, 2036.

Read more: 5 Plans to Head Off the Apophis Killer Asteroid - Popular Mechanics
Scientists calculate that if Apophis passes at a distance of exactly 18,893 miles, it will go through a "gravitational keyhole." This small region in space--only about a half mile wide, or twice the diameter of the asteroid itself--is where Earth's gravity would perturb Apophis in just the wrong way, causing it to enter an orbit seven-sixths as long as Earth's. In other words, the planet will be squarely in the crosshairs for a potentially catastrophic asteroid impact precisely seven years later, on April 13, 2036.

Read more: 5 Plans to Head Off the Apophis Killer Asteroid - Popular Mechanics
Scientists calculate that if Apophis passes at a distance of exactly 18,893 miles, it will go through a "gravitational keyhole." This small region in space--only about a half mile wide, or twice the diameter of the asteroid itself--is where Earth's gravity would perturb Apophis in just the wrong way, causing it to enter an orbit seven-sixths as long as Earth's. In other words, the planet will be squarely in the crosshairs for a potentially catastrophic asteroid impact precisely seven years later, on April 13, 2036.

Read more: 5 Plans to Head Off the Apophis Killer Asteroid - Popular Mechanics
I wonder if the makers of the phone knew this and did that as a joke. Maybe the world will end so there is no point in making their calendar go passed that, haw haw.

Even though this phone will likely be ripped apart and its parts recycled into other products long before then.

Also, it only goes back to the year 1902.
I've looked up any significant events that happened in 1902 and can't find anything outstanding. A man named Nathan B. Stubblefield  invented the first mobile phone, maybe it was a nod to him.

Or maybe I am reading into things too much and there is no special reason and I've just wasted both of our time. You're very welcome.

 

Now here is a picture of my cat looking quite pleased.




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